Our panel of 91 professional philosophers has responded to

67
 questions about 
Truth
133
 questions about 
Love
104
 questions about 
Art
34
 questions about 
Music
116
 questions about 
Children
81
 questions about 
Identity
68
 questions about 
Happiness
124
 questions about 
Profession
87
 questions about 
Law
217
 questions about 
Education
69
 questions about 
Business
58
 questions about 
Punishment
75
 questions about 
Beauty
58
 questions about 
Abortion
1270
 questions about 
Ethics
54
 questions about 
Medicine
96
 questions about 
Time
167
 questions about 
Freedom
110
 questions about 
Biology
79
 questions about 
Death
151
 questions about 
Existence
32
 questions about 
Sport
36
 questions about 
Literature
284
 questions about 
Language
51
 questions about 
War
5
 questions about 
Economics
572
 questions about 
Philosophy
88
 questions about 
Physics
43
 questions about 
Color
208
 questions about 
Science
2
 questions about 
Action
77
 questions about 
Emotion
2
 questions about 
Culture
391
 questions about 
Religion
27
 questions about 
Gender
75
 questions about 
Perception
67
 questions about 
Feminism
282
 questions about 
Knowledge
283
 questions about 
Mind
244
 questions about 
Justice
31
 questions about 
Space
365
 questions about 
Logic
5
 questions about 
Euthanasia
38
 questions about 
Race
220
 questions about 
Value
153
 questions about 
Sex
23
 questions about 
History
107
 questions about 
Animals
24
 questions about 
Suicide

Question of the Day

Someone might reasonably think that the question what personal identity consists of is to be answered by psychology. So we can imagine looking at the formation of individuality over time, through childhood and on, and think we were answering the philosophical question what identity consists of. Clearly psychology cannot pre-empt the answer to the question whether, for example, the bodily criterion of identity is correct. There are a lot of other examples to choose from. The one I am most interested in at the moment is perception. Perceiving, as Ryle points out, is not a process, but the termination of one, like scoring a goal, to use Ryle's example. You can't ask how long it took to perceive some goat or other, and you ask how long the scoring of a goal took. You can ask of course in a different way how log it to Aston Villa to score a goal - the whole of the first half, say. It took them forty-five minutes. But what about the actual scoring? That is as you might say instantaneous. It happens when the ball crosses the goal-line, whenever that is. I imagine it is the first moment at which any bit of the ball, no matter how small, enters the goal or has crossed the line.