Add this site to your Home Screen by opening it in Safari, tapping and selecting "Add to home screen"

Our panel of 89 professional philosophers has responded to

Question of the day

Greetings. I have been to Iran and practiced philosophy there at a conference and two of your universities. I am not clear, however, about the limits on free speech and protected (or prohibited) research projects, if any. If you are a student, I suggest you work up a proposed project in applied ethics --this might involve medical ethics, environmental ethics, military ethics, professional ethics or investigating some area of moral and social life involving the economy (looking into business ethics or into the adequacy of market systems --contrasting free markets with socialist societies, for example), religious practices, matters of gender, family structures, and so on. I would then suggest you contact a professional philosopher at the nearest university to ask her or him about resources and the direction of your work. The American Philosophical Association (of which I am a member) strongly supports uncensored, free inquiry in all parts of the world. Even though the APA would probably be uncompromising in its calling all persons to courageous free inquiry, I think that some prudence is important or at least awareness of how the state or law would evaluate your philosophical work. In terms of my personal connections with Iran, I found the philosophers I met to be of the highest quality both as scholars and as persons with great integrity and wisdom. I wager you would find a welcome place at the university tackling the applied ethics of your choice. But if we imagine a clear case when a government cracks down on liberty such as North Korea, there will probably there be little tolerance for philosophers who challenge the government.