Does the human mind perceive sight in 3 dimensions, or do we actually see in 2

Does the human mind perceive sight in 3 dimensions, or do we actually see in 2

Does the human mind perceive sight in 3 dimensions, or do we actually see in 2 dimensions, where depth perception and distance really don't exist in our mind? For example, I am looking at a bridge 100 yards away, I place my finger directly in front of the bridge. Now in the external world there exists a finger an arm's length away from my eyes, and a bridge 100 yards away. If the picture that occurs in my mind is a 2 dimensional picture then my finger and the bridge are located on the same plane in my mind, and distance would not truly exist in my perception. But if the mind's perception of sight occurs in 3 dimensions, like a hologram, then the picture I receive through sight must occur in a three dimensional space in my mind, where distances must be in the same but smaller ratios as exist in the external world. Here occurs a problem. If our perception of vision occurs in smaller but equal ratios of three dimensions, then the same object would have two sizes: That which exists in my mind (extremely small), and that which exists in the external world (large). Since the same object cannot possibly exist as both small and large, then we are back to the 2 dimensional version of sight where distance and depth do not exist. This was hard to put into words, but I hope someone can help me out. Billy H.

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