My question is a little bit technical. As you know, from Heidegger to

My question is a little bit technical. As you know, from Heidegger to

My question is a little bit technical. As you know, from Heidegger to Structuralism, there is always a theme of an "iron cage". In other words, we are always bound by language, structure, or something else. This word "iron cage" was as far as I find used by Weber first. But, I wonder, who is the first western philosopher who used such an idea of being bounded by a surrounding system. For example, can we count Hegel as an "iron cage" philosopher as for him no one can go beyond the <i>volksgeist</i>? Kind Regards, Nyouri Oezturk

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