Our panel of 91 professional philosophers has responded to

151
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81
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218
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Question of the Day

My understanding is that Buddhism teaches the doctrine of anatta — "no self." This doesn't mean that there aren't people in the ordinary sense. It means that there is no underyling metaphysical substance that amounts to the self. But I'm not aware of anything in Buddhism that would fairly be described as solipsism. So "the internet" got this one wrong (except for the thousands of places where it gets it right.

as for thoughts, feelings, emotions, etc., people do think, they do feel, they do have emotions. Or better, perhaps, there are thoughts, there are feelings, there are emotions. But they aren't tied together by some underyling soul or mental substance. The Scottish philosopher David Hume held a similar view. On Hume's view, a person is a "bundle of perceptions," though that's a bit too crude to get it right. In recent philosophical history, Derek Parfit developed a view that he would be the first to admit owes a great deal to Hume and to Buddhism.

As for minds and consciousnesses, it depends on what you mean. If by a "consciousness" you mean some sort of entity above and beyond the brain/body complex, I take the Buddhist view to be that there isn't such a thing. But if you want a more informed and detailed answer, you might take a look at this from the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:

https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/mind-indian-buddhism/